Edmontosaurus

Edmontosaurus is a genus of hadrosaurid dinosaur. It contains two known species: E. regalis and E. annectens. Edmontosaurus was one of the last non-avian dinosaurs. It lived alongside dinosaurs like Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus, Albertosaurus and Pachycephalosaurus shortly before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event.

About Edmontosaurus in brief

Summary EdmontosaurusEdmontosaurus is a genus of hadrosaurid dinosaur. It contains two known species: E. regalis and E. annectens. Edmontosaurus was one of the last non-avian dinosaurs. It lived alongside dinosaurs like Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus, Albertosaurus and Pachycephalosaurus shortly before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. It was a herbivore that could move on both two legs and four. Because it is known from several bone beds, it is thought to have lived in groups, and may have been migratory as well. It is classified as a saurolophine, meaning it lacked large, hollow crests, instead having smaller solid crests or fleshy combs. Its taxonomic history intertwines at various points with the genera Agathaumas, Anatosaurus, Anatotitan, Claosaurus, Hadrosaurus, Thespesius, and Trachodon, and references predating the 1980s typically use Anatosaurus or Tracodon for edmontosaur fossils. The best known of these is E. annecten, named by Othniel Charles Marsh in 1892; originally as a species of Claososaurus, known for many years as a. species of Trachodons. The first well-supported species of Edmontosaurus was named in 18 92 as Claosaur annectense. This species is based on USNM 2414, a partial skull-roof and skeleton. A second skull and skeleton, YPM 2182, designated the paratype, was collected in 1891 by John Bell Hatcher from the late Maastrichtian-age Upper Cret Jurassic Lance Formation of Niobrara County, Wyoming.

Both were put on display in 1904, and USNM2414 was put on show in 1904. Because of the incomplete understanding of the genus at the time, the species was not explicitly identified as C.annectens by Hatcher. The species is among the first dinosaurs to receive a skeletal restoration, and is the first dinosaur in the world to have had its skeletons so restored in the first century of the 20th century. It can be found on display at the Museum of the Rockies in Denver, Colorado, in the U.S. and at the National Museum of Natural History in London, England in the UK in the next few years. It has been described as a ‘duck-billed’ dinosaur, but this is not an official definition of the species. It could have weighed up to 4.0 metric tons and was found in western North America. It was widely distributed across western North American. The distribution of fossils suggests that it preferred coasts and coastal plains. The wealth of fossils has allowed researchers to study its paleobiology in detail, including its brain, how it may have fed, and its injuries and pathologies, such as evidence for tyrannosaur attacks on a few ed montosaur specimens.